Monday, January 16, 2017

"Jim Crow and the Wilson Administration: Protesting Federal Segregation in the Early Twentieth Century" by Nicholas Palter

https://www.amazon.com/Jim-Crow-Wilson-Administration-Segregation/dp/0870818643

Sometime ago, I purchased "Jim Crow and the Wilson Administration: Protesting Federal Segregation in the Early Twentieth Century," by Nicholas Patler It is about the resistance to Woodrow Wilson implementation of segregation in employment by the Federal government.

What I really liked about this book is the preface. I haven't had time to read the book yet, but will.

Patler in the preface to the book describes his attendance at a history session about Woodrow Wilson where the historians really didn't want to deal with Wilson's racism. Patler writes that the audience members "referred to the inconsistency between Wilson's ardent defense of individual freedom and equality at home and abroad the the poor treatment of blacks in America ..."

Patler reveals that the historians in the conference were really fans of Wilson rather than historians.

Patler writes:
"I did not hear a good explanation that day. Although Dr. Link admitted that this attitude was 'a blemish on the Wilson administration," it seemed the speakers in general tiptoed around the topic, and the consensus was, in so many words, 'Why focus on this negative aspect of the Wilson years when he accomplished so many positive things?'" 
Patler's mentions in his preface that in his investigations he discovered:

"Not only were African Americans segregated en masse in federal departments, but in many cases they were harassed, downgraded, and terminated as well."

There is this video of him talking on C-Span about Woodrow Wilson
https://www.c-span.org/person/?nicholaspatler

Yet, Princeton University decided that Wilson still needed to be honored as some type of hero.

This was the general environment of the early 20th century in which the Arlington Confederate Monument went up.



United Daughters of the Confederacy North Carolina Division Ku Klux Klan Post Card

The United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) is the group that led the effort to erect the Arlington Confederate Monument. This post card by the North Carolina Division of the UDC shows what Confederate "heritage" meant to the UDC.

The North Carolina Division of the UDC was so proud of their donation of a flag of the Ku Klux Klan to the Museum of the Confederacy that they issued a post card to publicize it.

CLICK ON THE IMAGES TO SEE THE WHOLE IMAGE



Saturday, January 14, 2017

William Howard Taft's "Little Brown Brothers." The Philippines American War and the brutal suppression of Philippine Independence

William Howard Taft was the first American Governor-General of the Philippines when the Philippine Independence movement was brutally suppressed by the American army after the Spanish American War.

The Filipinos had an independence movement and with the defeat of the Spanish by the Americans they sought to establish an independent Philippines. The American government however decided to keep the Philippine as part of the spoils of war and waged a brutal ware of suppression against the Philippine independence movement.

The death tool of Filipinos is estimated to be 200,000.

https://history.state.gov/milestones/1899-1913/war


The book, "Little Brown Brother: How the United States Purchased and Pacified the Philippine Islands at the Century's Turn," by Leon Wolff, was published in 1962 and was awarded the Francis Parker Prize by the Society of American Historians an affiliate of the American Historical Association.

It was reissued in 2001 updated and including accounts of numerous atrocities committed by U.S. Soldiers during the Philippines-American War. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_brown_brother

It is available in both hard cover and soft cover and used copies are available.
https://www.amazon.com/Little-Brown-Brother-Purchased-Philippine/dp/1582882096/

This isn't the only book available on the topic.  Another book is "Benevolent Assimilation: The American Conquest of the Philippines, 1899-1903," by Stuart Creighton Miller, who was a professor at San Francisco State University and published by Yale University. It also is available in hard cover and soft cover and used copies. Though the used hard copies are really expensive, but the used paperback copies are quite cheap.

I just finished ordering both of them.

This is one article about William Howard Taft's administration of the Philippines.

http://www.libertas.bham.ac.uk/publications/Essays/Microsoft%20Word%20-%20BAASPhilippinesAdamBurns[1].pdf

This is a dissertation, "William Howard Taft and the Philippines, 1900-1921."
https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/280064.pdf

I am not necessarily endorsing them, but I think they are eye-opening. The whole occupation is just appalling in its racism.


For those people who always like to excuse the atrocities and behaviors of the past, I give you a speech delivered in 1899 to the Phi Beta Kappa Society of Yale University by William Graham Sumner. It was published in the Yale Law Journal, Jan. 1899.  The title is,  "The Conquest of the United States by Spain." Please no arguments about presentism. The occupation of the Philippines was understood to be an appalling idea then as it is understood to be now.  The link to the address given by Sumner is below.


http://praxeology.net/WGS-CUS.htm









Thursday, January 12, 2017

The Brownsville Incident

The Brownsville Incident was were 167 African American troops stationed in Brownsville, Texas were unjustly dishonorably discharged in 1906 by Theodore Roosevelt as part of Roosevelt's pandering to white supremacists.

The dishonorable discharges were reversed in 1972 by Richard Nixon.

The white citizens of Brownsville, Texas were furious that African American troops were stationed in their town and waged a campaign to get rid of them.


http://scholarworks.umb.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1022&context=trotter_review

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brownsville_Affair

https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/articles/blacksMilitary/BlacksMilitaryBrownsville.htm

There is a book on the Brownsville Incident by, "The Brownsville Raid," by John D. Weaver, published in 1970.

https://books.google.com/books?id=ZPoa6od2tYUC&pg=PA321#v=onepage&q&f=false


This was the America which allowed a Confederate monument at the Arlington National Cemetery.





Monday, January 9, 2017

Rayford W. Logan's book "The Betrayal of the Negro"

Rayford W. Logan's book, "The Betrayal of the Negro: From Rutherford B. Hayes to Woodrow Wilson" is a classic and major work of African American history. It is about the oppression of African Americans from after the fall of Reconstruction in 1877 to the end of Woodrow Wilson's term and show how the political system betrayed African Americans rights as human beings.

It is widely available in libraries and you can order it online and often it is in book stores. It is well worth reading. In reading it you will understand the context of the acceptance of having a Confederate monument erected in Arlington National Cemetery. The monument is the crowning of the triumph of white supremacy in American and the defeat of African American civil rights.

These are some links to learn about the book.

https://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/3437918


This is the wikipedia page on Rayford Logan:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rayford_Logan

Besides blogging on the effort to convince President-Elect Donald Trump not to send a wreath to the Arlington Confederate Monument, I am also going to be blogging items about the times when this monument went up so that this white supremacist monument is seen as a phenomenon of a white supremacist time.



Sunday, January 8, 2017

President William Howard Taft in 1912 at the dedication of the Arlington Confederate Monument explains that the Civil War is about white pride.

President Taft’s speech at the dedication of the Arlington Confederate Monument. 

Pages 18 – 21, “History of The Arlington Confederate Monument at Arlington, Virginia,” by Hilary A. Herbert, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Arlington Confederate Monument Association. Copyright United Daughters of the Confederacy 1914. Boldface is added to this speech by the blogger. Spelling as found in the book.  The speech given by Taft is an erasure of history. 

Also, note Taft's warm feeling about the incoming Woodrow Wilson administration which will institute segregation in Federal employment and Wilson himself will show the pro-Ku Klux Klan movie, "Birth of a Nation," in the White House and praise it as "history written with lightning." 

The text follows:  

Evening, November 12, 1912.
Mrs. Marion Butler, President of the District of Columbia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, introduced the President of the Board of Commissioners of the District of Columbia, who heartily welcomed the Daughters to the city in glowing words.
Mrs. Butler next introduced the President of the United States, Mr. Taft, saying:

"This is the first time the Daughters of the Confederacy have held an Annual Convention out of the South. We have assembled here to lay the corner-stone of a Confederate monument, to be erected at Arlington, the Federal Cemetery, the former home of Lee. Permission to build this monument was granted to the Daughters of the District of Columbia and the Confederate Veterans by Mr. Taft when Secretary of War. We deem it most fortunate and propitious that we are assembled in the National Capital for such a purpose and are to be welcomed by the same distinguished citizen, who is now President of the United States. We trust that the building of this monument will be the keystone of the arch of a reunited country.
Ladies, the President."

The President replied as follows:
"Ladies of the United Daughters of the Confederacy:
I beg to welcome you to Washington. You have captured this city beautiful and made it more lovely by your presence. As its temporary head, I give you the freedom of the city, and recognize that in what you have done, you have founded a shrine and an altar here which will be visited in the future by many a faithful pilgrim.
If the occasion which brings you here were the mourning at the bier of a lost cause, I know that the nice sense of propriety of a fine old social school would have prevented you from inviting me, as the President of the United States, to be present. You are not here to mourn or support a cause. You are here to celebrate, and justly to celebrate, the heroism, the courage and the sacrifice to the uttermost of your fathers and your brothers and your mothers and your sisters, and of all your kin, in a cause which they believed in their hearts to be right, and for which they were willing to lay down their lives. That cause ceased to be, except in history, now more than half a century ago. It was one which could elicit from half a nation, and brave and warlike race, a four year struggle in which lives, property, and everything save honor were willingly parted with for its sake. So great was the genius for military leadership of many of your generals, so adaptable was the individual of your race to effective warlike training, so full of patriotic sacrifice were your people that now when all the bitterness of the struggle on our part of the North has passed away, we are able to share with you of the South your just pride in your men and women who carried on the unexampled contest to an exhaustion that few countries ever suffered. The calm observer and historian, whatever his origin, may now rejoice in his heart that the Lord ordained it as it is. But no son of the South and no son of the North, with any spark in him of pride of race, can fail to rejoice in that common heritage of courage and glorious sacrifice that we have in the story of the Civil War and on both sides in the Civil War.
It has naturally taken a long time for the spirit of hostility that such an internecine struggle develops completely to die away. Of course it has lasted a less time with those who were the victors and into whose homes and domestic lives the horrows of war were not directly thrust. The physical evidences of war were traceable in the South for decades after they had utterly disappeared in the North in the few places in which they existed. Then there are conditions in the South which are a constant reminder of the history of the past. Until within recent decades, prosperity has not shed her boon of comfort upon the South with as generous a hand as upon the North. Hence those of us at the North who have been sometimes impatient at a little flash now and then of the old sectional antagonism are unreasonable in our failure to appreciate these marked differences.
For years after the war, the Republican Party, which had carried the nation through the war to its successful conclusion, was in control of the administration of the Government, and it was impossible for the Southerner to escape the feeling that he was linked in his allegiance to an alien nation and one with whose destiny he found it difficult to identify himself. Time, however, cures much, and after awhile there came a Democratic Administration of four years, and then another one of four years. Southerners were called to Federal offices, they came to have more and more influence in the halls of Congress and in the Senate, and the responsibility of the Government brought with it a sense of closer relationship to it and to all the people for whom the Government was carried on.
I speak for my immediate Republican predecessors in office when I say that they all labored to bring the sections more closely together. I am sure I can say that, so far as in me has lain, I have left nothing undone to reduce the sectional feeling and to make the divisions of this country geographical only. But I am free to admit that circumstances have rendered it more difficult for a Republican Administration than for a Democratic Administration, to give to our Southern brothers and sisters the feeling of close relationship and ownership in the Government of the United States. Therefore, in solving the mystery of that Providential dispensation which now brings on a Democratic Administration to succeed this, we must admit the good that will come to the whole country in a more confirmed sense of partnership in this Government which our brothers and sisters of the Southland will enjoy in an Administration, in which Southern opinion will naturally have greater influence, and the South greater proportionate representation in the Cabinet, in Congress, and in other high official stations. While I rejoice in the steps that I have been able to take to heal the wounds of sectionalism and to convey to the Southern people, as far as I could, my earnest desire to make this country one, I can not deny that my worthy and distinguished successor has a greater opportunity, and I doubt not he will use it for the benefit of the nation at large.
It fell to my official lot, with universal popular approval, to issue the order which made it possible to erect, in the National
Cemetery of Arlington, the beautiful monument to the heroic dead of the South that you founded today. The event in itself speaks volumes as to the oblivion of sectionalism. It gives me not only great pleasure and great honor, but it gives me the greatest satisfaction as a lover of my country, to be present, as President of the United States, and pronounce upon this occasion the benediction of all true Americans."


The President was given an ovation, the convention rising in appreciation of his greeting.

Saturday, January 7, 2017

Huge readership spike of this blog from South Korea

I am getting ready to write Donald Trump asking him not to send a wreath to the Arlington Confederate Monument. I was reviewing the information I collected in 2009 and also what I have since learned.

I was looking at the Arlington Confederate Monument Report blog and I noticed that there had been a spike in viewers and so first I went to see where they were from. How surprising to see that the most viewers were from South Korea. It is hard to see on the Google map supplied below but you can see the South Korean readership in the list.

Japan has recently called home some envoys because they are upset over a statue to memorialize South Korean women who were put into brothels by the Japanese military in World War II.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/06/asia/japan-diplomats-south-korea/

http://time.com/4625449/japan-south-korea-comfort-women-statue/

I think that the move by Japan to retaliate is not well thought out. There are probably in the last week hundreds of millions of people who previously had never heard of the "comfort" women, sex slaves for the Japanese military, who now have learned the history of these sex slaves.

I also think it was very foolish that it was thought that a treaty agreement could be done to push this historical crime down a memory hole. Did the Japanese government really think this would work?

Good for those who won't allow this to be pushed down the memory hole. One time in preparation for a short business trip to Korea, I read a 600 page history of Korea. Korea history has good parts, but poor Korea has had some really bad times, such as the Mongol invasion and the Japanese occupation.

I don't know why the Japanese government isn't just ignoring the statue, perhaps there is a nationalist desire for a conflict.

As for my South Korean readers, I hope my blog was a help.

As for the Russian readership, there is an interest in Russia to foment division, like secession, in the United States and I am getting periods of high readership from Russia occasionally for my blogs.

This is captured from the screen on 1/7/2017 at 8:30 pm roughly EST.


Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Popular Posts All Time